Impressed (…or not!): My Favorite Moment

While Little Mister offers his best gift to passersby with unselfconscious abandon, a second child wanders into view at :51, noticing but unaffected by the amazing performance, enraptured by what delights him/her–ice cream or the chili sample in the bowl. (It’s Costo, after all.)

May we, with such authenticity, abandon ourselves to what delights await us in each present moment, where God makes himself known to each of us.

Watch to the end for a smile and a great finish. It only gets better!

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Hello Friday: Summer’s End

I’ve been living with Psalm 103:6 this week:

“The LORD works righteousness and justice for all the oppressed.”

In the midst of the world’s chaos, I must remind myself often that the seemingly encapsulated moment I’m in is not the end of any story; that we are each being invited to join in working for all the oppressed, whatever our hands are given to do. For some it is the writing of powerful words that positively influence a culture’s thinking, and over time, behavior. May it be so.

Gilead.
It took me over a decade to get to it, a year to finally finish it. I’m quite sure Marilynne would not be disappointed–after all, she appreciates slow, careful thought. Once through and I am a devoted fan. She has written much more that’s worthy of your time and mine, but Gilead is the most famous of the trilogy telling the stories of those we come to love through the eyes of Jack Boughton, and “who were not finished with me!” (she says) at the end of the first of the three.

Here is a sampling of why I love what and how she writes:

“It seems to me people tend to forget that we are to love our enemies, not to satisfy some standard of righteousness but because God their Father loves them.”
― Marilynne RobinsonGilead

“There are a thousand thousand reasons to live this life, everyone of them sufficient”
― Marilynne Robinson

“I’ve developed a great reputation for wisdom by ordering more books than I ever had time to read, and reading more books, by far, than I learned anything useful from, except, of course, that some very tedious gentlemen have written books.”
― Marilynne RobinsonGilead

Her understated manner, available for viewing on YouTube and with which I am now well acquainted, is equally engaging. I spent several dark hours this week following her story from Sandpoint, ID to Massachusetts to Iowa City, and a few points in between. I learned about the coveted Iowa Writer’s Workshop, a program in which she taught for 20 years which took me to other renowned writers and more books to read. (Tip: When you have a migraine, set your app preference to Autoplay and let ‘er roll.) The net effect was a return to a bit of fiction writing I had once dabbled in. Who knows…?)

Speaking of books, videos, etc. this podcast featuring Brene Brown and Jen Hatmaker is a delight–and a lot of Texas in one place! I’m not an early adopter–I was into Brene long before fame, and have shied away from jumping on the Jen-wagon. But seriously–even if it is hard to say “seriously” and “Jen” in the same sentence–it’s a great listen. And I have become a fan. If you get a chance, pick up Jen’s For the Love. Available to check out on Kindle if your book budget is a little thin by Summers’ end.

Boo with pear

The pears were picked in the orchard next door this week, also a signal that Summer is ending. So is “Back to School” which is all the buzz around here with lots of grands–from first grade through university. One cent composition books…multi-colored Sharpies…five dollar flash drives? Who can resist?!? Now that’s life-giving! 🙂

Finally, Fall planning is in full swing:

  • New pages for the ARC disc planner
  • September Formation start-up
  • October’s annual board meeting
  • A visit to a friend’s new home
  • Last push on the home renovation…maybe by Christmas!

Hello Friday: All In

Hello Friday is a look over my shoulder at the events of the past week. I notice what was life-giving and then share it with you, a week-ending examen. Maybe you’ll find something in it that brings you life, too; maybe even try your own.

A tornado ripped through our favorite beach getaway last year, a sleepy bay town on the picturesque Oregon Coast usually shielded from such trauma.

Whether we would join our grands and their parents this year was up in the air until the last minute when we decided, “we’re all in.” We would leave and return when they did; eat and sleep and play when and where they did; stay in the rented house together and be present for the entire six days. All of us, all of them, all in.

We skipped last year, opting for a different beach, but when we rounded the curve and saw “our” beach, inhaled the ocean air, I remembered the magic of the place. The green, translucent mug declaring in gold letters, “I come to the sea to breathe,” has survived several rounds of cupboard clearing. It’s still my fave. (I also remembered getting lost after dark in the state campground just up the road because I turned the wrong direction leaving the shower building…but, um, that’s a story for another time.

I’ve been reading Richard Rohr’s Divine Dance and Ian Cron’s Chasing Francis. Both books have a lot to say about Francis of Assisi and his way of living all in, and seem to be watering a thirst in my soul of which I wasn’t even aware.

I watched someone kite surfing (watch this!) for 30 minutes today. It made me wonder what would happen if I lived every day abandoned to the flow of God’s Love, Power and Goodness the way this surfer rode the ocean’s breakers, kite to the wind.

It wasn’t all romance and reflection– there were two-year-old twins in the cottage and more “hangry” kids ranging from six to thirteen. That’s a lot of cereal, tuna and chips! And lots of sand, wet towels and sunburn–with plenty of screen time thrown in. Salted caramel ice cream (nooooo!) was less than a block away and the beach, just four.

Can you ask for more? Yes. Yes, you can. Awareness. Awareness that it is all gift, lavished on us as abundantly as the water that fills the sea. The gift of:

  • My daughter’s belly-laugh over Jen Hatmaker’s latest book, Of Mess and Moxie
  • Running down the sidewalk to take in one more effusive sunset
  • Fragrant morning coffee at Bread and Ocean
  • Sticky hands in mine helping littles across the street–fourth day on the same jawbreaker notwithstanding…
  • Snuggled next to Mr S watching Lion on the Kindle late into the night
  • Petting EVERY dog on EVERY leash–and they are legion

Equally life-giving was a quick day trip to visit another family campsite.

PNW: Grownups’ playground

Good eats and glamour

Our favorite meat market

New to me: Kombucha…Yumm!

Finally, on Wednesday, Genesis 28 gave me this phrase:

“Surely the Lord was in this place, and I was not aware of it.”

And you? What has given you life this week? Where was the Lord in your places?

The End.

Hello Friday: Streams of Living Water

Today’s post is a quick hello, hoping to inspire you to notice from whence your own streams flow.

In preparation for Fall startup of CFDM’s Formation 2 program, I’m studying for a presentation on what Richard Foster has termed “streams,” the six major traditions of the Christian faith beginning with the resurrection of Christ, and reading his (Foster’s) book, Streams of Living Water. The only ‘D’ I earned as a student was in History so the irony that I’m not only fascinated by, but deign to teach on, this particular history is not lost on me! As with many of Richard’s writings, his most compelling words are in his explaining why he writes on the topic at hand, or why he recommends the work of another. Such is the case here–he had me at “Introduction.”

I’ve spent a lot of time focused on the state of my physical body this past week. Marta Taylor,  Erin Knight, Corey Schuler have done a fabulous job with the Chronic Headache and Migraine Summit, putting together a panel of speakers to teach on various aspects of cause, management and in some cases, extinction. It has been life-giving.

I had lunch with a friend I’ve not spent time with in years. Honestly, she took the initiative, not me. We sat together at my humble, DIY bar over a simple chicken salad and kombucha where we shared hearts and got reacquainted. How easily we isolate ourselves, limiting the possibility of transformation taking place in others just as it is for us–if we remain open to discovery. Hidden gifts might be waiting that are otherwise missed.

Family has been especially meaningful this week, as our nephew has undergone a second heart transplant. It’s a complex tension, as we hold both his recovery and the donor’s loved ones in prayer. At 17, parents and siblings, cousins, aunts, uncles and friends have rallied to support in so many ways:

People in hospital waiting room

  • Prayer, prayer and more prayer
  • Interrupting vacation plans to get to the hospital in time for the procedure
  • Several people traveling hours to be with family in the waiting room
  • Extended stays nearby to be available
  • Stocking and transporting the camp trailer for family to stay in during the weeks of recovery
  • Posting on social media
  • Artists and friends contributing gifts of prayer and beauty
  • Donating vacation time to supervise siblings and run errands

And in the midst of it, I treasure the overnighter with my ten-year-old granddaughter and an afternoon spent at the library, lunch and shopping with the thirteen-ager; the impromptu drive with another to the pet store (30 minutes away to return the ill chameleon he gave her for their first anniversary–he loves her THAT much); good conversation over dinner with Mr. S; yoga twice this week to stretch and tone and tame an over-active mind.

All of these have been streams of living water to me this week, reminding me that:

  • Life is a gift
  • We are invited to step in fully
  • Difficult times are inevitable
  • We are not alone

As this week of summer days winds to a close, may you be mindful of the Source of Life from which streams of living water flow to you, the moments and experiences that have nourished you these past few days. (If you’re in a dark time–I have been–you may have to work at it…!) May that lead you toward peace, shalom, which is to say in Hebrew, wholeness.

 

” Wholeness does not mean perfection.”

Here’s a quote worth thinking about from Parker Palmer’s A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life (Jossey-Bass, 2004)

“Wholeness does not mean perfection: it means embracing brokenness as an integral part of life. Knowing this gives me hope that human wholeness – mine, yours, ours – need not be a utopian dream, if we can use devastation as a seedbed for new life.”

There’s no denying brokenness. I admit that detecting devastation comes more rapidly to me than envisioning seeds of new life. While I don’t particularly tolerate it–brokenness–well in myself, I have developed an appreciation for its role.

In fact, denying brokenness by reaching into the bag for seeds of new life before the soil of devastation has warmed, may interrupt its very important work in us. Premature “hope,” indiscriminately scattered, may never germinate.  Continue reading

Injured? 3 Essentials for Returning to the Game (Pt. 2)

Jeans with hole in knee

When we sustain an injury, a little self-care may be necessary if we’re to return to the game. Consider taking an intentional approach to recovery. (Click here for Part 1 of this two-part post.)

Acknowledge – Be real with ourselves and our situation

Pride is a killer. I hate it when I have to admit that everything’s NOT okay. But sometimes it’s just not. And while our difficulties don’t need to be broadcast to everyone, we need to be willing to tell the truth at least to ourselves. It’s normal and healthy, and in fact good Continue reading

Injured? 3 Essentials for Returning to the Game (Pt. 1)

Man and woman playing pickleball outdoors

Courtesy of Creative Commons. Photo credit here.

Pickleball. I started playing two or three years ago at my husband’s urging as a way to get some moderate exercise–and so he would quit nagging me. I figured it had something to do with the comic strip that follows the antics of Earl and Opal Pickles as they learn the ropes of retirement, and while it is popular with the retired set, don’t be fooled by the association. It’s actually a rather rigorous court sport originating in the Northwest, which shouldn’t be played by people with bad knees.

Some sessions result in more-than-moderate exercise. Ergo, six months in, my “all out or get out” approach netted me a severe sprained ankle that sidelined me for the next Continue reading

Why Resurrection May Not Be For You

If you can’t stand messes, if you’re a neat freak or a systems specialist, the idea of resurrection may not set well with you. Apparently in its wake, what ensues is pretty much chaos. Sacred perhaps, but still chaos–then Continue reading

Vulnerability: What to Do When You Feel Like Bono’s Luggage

Have you seen this today from CNN?

Bono

“Have you seen Bono’s luggage?

“U2’s Bono was en route to Germany when a door on his private jet fell off midflight, sending his luggage tumbling out.”

Vulnerability is apparently the new power suit. I don’t wear it very well. Everywhere I turn, every expert voice is encouraging vulnerability as the latest leg-up on success. But I’m lousy at it. I’m too well-practiced in image-management for vulnerability to take root quickly or easily–not that it’s quick or easy for anyone remotely human. Our birthright seems to come stock with a self-protection plan. Continue reading

If You’re Happy…A Tale of Transformation

If you’re happy and you know it… Say “Amen”
Clap your hand
Stomp your feet
Turn around

Much of my life’s energy has been spent on trying to make people happy in one way or another: Continue reading